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Showing posts from August, 2019

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What Does Warm up and Cool Down To Our Body??

 What is WARM UP?? A warm-up is a pre-exercise phase that usually consists of low- to moderate-intensity movements and activities. Its main goal is to progressively raise the body's core temperature, pulse rate, breathing rate, and blood supply to the muscles that are in use. The purpose of a warm-up is to get the body ready for more physically and psychologically taxing activities and exercise. Many exercises, including dynamic stretching, light aerobics, and sport-specific drills , are frequently used as part of a warm-up. These exercises improve brain activation, joint mobility, and muscular flexibility. A warm-up also makes it easier for oxygen to reach the muscles efficiently, which enhances energy metabolism and lowers the chance of injury. The warm-up phase facilitates the change from a state of inactivity or rest to one of physical exertion preparation. It is seen as a crucial part of any fitness programme, helping to enhance performance, reduce injuries, and promote gener

Medial Elbow Tendinopathy (Golfer’s Elbow)

Golfer’s elbow, also known as medial epicondylitis , medial epicondylalgia , or medial epicondylosis, involves the common flexor/pronator tendon at the tenoperiosteal junction near the medial epicondyle. It is associated with repetitive movements into wrist flexion, such as swinging a golf club, pitching a ball, or work-related grasping, shuffling papers and lifting heavy objects. Concomitant ulnar neuropathy is often an associated finding.                                                    Positive tests of provocation include palpation tenderness on or near the medial epicondyle, pain with resisted wrist flexion performed with the elbow extended, and pain with passive wrist extension performed with the elbow extended. Etiology of Symptoms                      The most common cause of epicondylalgia is excessive repetitive use or eccentric strain of the wrist or forearm muscles. The result is microdamage and partial tears, usually near the musculotendinous junction when th

Lateral Elbow Tendinopathy (Tennis Elbow)

Tennis elbow is commonly called lateral epicondylitis, lateral epicondylalgia , or lateral epicondylitis depending on whether inflammation is present or not. Tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis) problems usually occur in persons 35 years of age or older and in those who use a great deal of wrist flexion and extension in their occupations or activities, requiring wrist stabilization in slight extension Symptoms include pain in the common wrist extensor tendons along the lateral epicondyle and HR joint with gripping activities. Activities requiring firm wrist stability, such as the backhand stroke in tennis, or repetitive work tasks that require repeated wrist extension, such as computer keyboarding or pulling weeds in a garden, can stress the musculotendinous unit and cause symptoms.                      The most frequent location of involvement is in the musculotendinous junction of the extensor carpi radialis brevis although the extensor communis is also involved in many pa

How Physiotherapist helps in COUGHING?

What is the Role of a physiotherapist in Coughing? An effective cough is necessary to  eliminate respiratory obstructions  and keep the  lungs clear.  Coughing is one of the most common  Lung Airway clearance technique  which is performed by a person acting with minor instruction by therapist or instructors. Airway clearance is an important part of the management of patients with acute or chronic respiratory conditions. A cough may be reflexive or voluntary. When a person coughs, a series of actions occur, we call it as An effective cough is necessary to  eliminate respiratory obstructions  and keep the  lungs clear.  Coughing is one of the most common  Lung Airway clearance technique  which is performed by a person acting with minor instruction by therapist or instructors. Airway clearance is an important part of the management of patients with acute or chronic respiratory conditions., it includes: 1. The patient inhales air by the nose ( Deep inspiration occurs ) 2. Air tra

Ankle Bio mechanics : PART 1

The ankle/foot complex is structurally analogous to the wrist-hand complex of the upper extremity but has a number of distinct differences to optimize its primary role to bear weight. The complementing structures of the foot allow the foot to sustain large weight-bearing. the bones of the foot are traditionally divided into three functional segments. These are the hindfoot (posterior segment), composed of the talus and calcaneus ; the midfoot (middle segment) , composed of the navicular, cuboid, and three cuneiform bones ; and the forefoot (anterior segment) , composed of the metatarsals and the phalanges. These terms are commonly used in descriptions of ankle or foot dysfunction or deformity and are similarly useful in understanding normal ankle and foot function. The three motions of the ankle/foot complex that approximate cardinal planes and axes are dorsiflexion/ plantarflexion, inversion/eversion, and abduction/adduction. Dorsiflexion and plantarflexion are motions that occur